Long Now online

A place for great conversations and inspiring beverages from The Long Now Foundation. Now open in San Francisco.

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The Long Now Foundation fosters long-term thinking and responsibility through a variety of projects.

The Interval at Long Now is our new home in San Francisco. Open to the public as a cafe, bar, museum and event venue from 10am to midnight, seven days a week.

The Interval is located in Fort Mason Center on the San Francisco Bay, with a view of the Golden Gate Bridge. Our venue features music and art by Brian Eno and prototypes of the 10,000 Year Clock. A celebration of long-term thinking and serves inspiring beverages day and night.

In the spirit of the intellectual salons of another age, we want to create an atmosphere that encourages conversation and contemplation. Our space will feature a crowd-sourced library with thousands of books, a gallery of artifacts from our projects, and serve exceptional spirits and cocktails as well as top quality tea and coffee.

Projects of the Long Now Foundation:

Background photo by Robert Mann

Fostering Long-term Responsibility • est. 01996

 


We had our first Discussion Night at The Interval featuring Peter Schwartz (a founding Long Now Board member) on Monday August 18, 02014.
 
 
 
After Peter’s presentation we had a group discussion on the future of The Internet. It was a fantastic evening for all. Look for more of these in the future, in addition to our regular Tuesday Night Conversations series of talks. Watch our events page for details.

Peter Schwartz hosts Discussion Night at The Interval at Long Now

We had our first Discussion Night at The Interval featuring Peter Schwartz (a founding Long Now Board member) on Monday August 18, 02014.

Peter Schwartz hosts Discussion Night at The Interval at Long Now 

Peter Schwartz hosts Discussion Night at The Interval

Peter Schwartz hosts Discussion Night at The Interval at Long Now

After Peter’s presentation we had a group discussion on the future of The Internet. It was a fantastic evening for all. Look for more of these in the future, in addition to our regular Tuesday Night Conversations series of talks. Watch our events page for details.

steampunktendencies:

The Interval at the Long Now

A bar, cafe, museum, and the home of The Long Now Foundation. Located in San Francisco’s historic Fort Mason Center within sight of the Golden Gate Bridge and Alcatraz.

Long Now’s next in a series of small ‘salon talks’ at The Interval (our San Francisco headquarters, bar, cafe and museum) features authors Jon Mooallem and Laurel Braitman speaking on Tuesday, August 12th.

Go Animals" is the perfect name for this event with two authors who tell us so much about other creatures and about humans in the process. Above is Mooallem’s TED talk featuring a tale of animals, toys, marketing and politics of all things from his book Wild Ones.

Braitman’s book Animal Madness is a NYT Best Seller that looks at mental health in animals (and people) with a scientific and historical perspective. She is also a TED Fellow.

One of Laurel’s non-writing projects is arranging concerts for animals. That is the animals are the *audience*:

Shows for animals who are normally made to be shows themselves. Recent concerts have included surf rock for gorillas, country punk for a donkey, and psychedelia for sea lions.

Tickets are still available for their talk at The Interval

Jason Holt of Spectrum played for sea lions on a public pier north of Monterey

erikkwakkel:

Smart page with string

These pages from a late-16th-century scientific manuscript share a most unusual feature: they contain a string that runs through a pierced hole. Dozens of them are found in this book. The pages contain diagrams that accompany astronomical tracts. They show such things as the working of the astrolabe (Pic 1), the position of the stars (Pic 4), and the movement of the sun (Pic 6). The book was written and copied by the cartographer Jean du Temps of Blois (born 1555), about whom little appears to be known. The book contains a number of volvelles or wheel charts: revolving disks that the reader would turn to execute calculations. The strings seen in these images are another example of the “hands-on” kind of reading the book facilitates. Pulling the string tight and moving it from left to right, or all the way around, would connect different bits of data, like a modern computer: the string drew a temporary line between two or more values, highlighting their relationship. The tiny addition made the physical page as smart as its contents.

Pics: London, British Library, Harley MS 3263: more on this book here; and full digital reproduction here.

Dan Novy, aka Novysan, spoke about Science Fiction to Science Fabrication or “Pulp to Prototype” in our salon talk series at The Interval last week. It’s a class that he co-created at the MIT Media Lab on reading science fiction and then Making prototypes of the tech from the stories. Check out his presentation deck here.

It was also a nostalgia-fest of amazing science fiction book covers. So here are some of the coolest ones that he showed—all from books they read in the class.

Recently on the Long Now blog we covered the efforts to revive Andy Warhol’s lost computer artwork. In 01985 Warhol used an Amiga 1000 personal computer and the GraphiCraft software to create a series of digital artworks. Three decades later the files he created were unreadable—until a group of hackers at CMU set their minds to bringing them into the 21st century. Read more here

Recently on the Long Now blog we covered the efforts to revive Andy Warhol’s lost computer artwork. In 01985 Warhol used an Amiga 1000 personal computer and the GraphiCraft software to create a series of digital artworks. Three decades later the files he created were unreadable—until a group of hackers at CMU set their minds to bringing them into the 21st century. Read more here

A great sketch of our Orrery by Dan Bransfield. It’s a wonderful representation—thanks Dan! This is a 1/4 scale prototype of the orrery that will be in our 10,000 Year Clock.
Here’s what it looks like in person:

photo by Patricia Chang
But what’s an orrery?

An orrery is a mechanical model of the solar system that illustrates or predicts the relative positions and motions of the planets and moons, usually according to the heliocentric model.

A great sketch of our Orrery by Dan Bransfield. It’s a wonderful representation—thanks Dan! This is a 1/4 scale prototype of the orrery that will be in our 10,000 Year Clock.

Here’s what it looks like in person:

The Orrery at The Interval at Long Now

photo by Patricia Chang

But what’s an orrery?

An orrery is a mechanical model of the solar system that illustrates or predicts the relative positions and motions of the planets and moons, usually according to the heliocentric model.

A great photo from yesterday—our small room is ready. The Interval at Long Now is officially open to the public… NOW. Via mrsrobinsonsf:

The Long Now Foundation. #timetravel #longnow (at Fort Mason Center)

A great photo from yesterday—our small room is ready. The Interval at Long Now is officially open to the public… NOW. Via mrsrobinsonsf:

The Long Now Foundation. #timetravel #longnow (at Fort Mason Center)

For our 100th post on Tumblr, here’s one of the great texts about Long Now: the essay by Brian Eno that gave name to the Clock and our organization. “The Big Here and the Long Now" was written in 01995 before the Foundation was formally founded. Long Now existed only as an idea in conversation between Danny Hillis, Stewart Brand, Eno, Kevin Kelly, and others back then. Now we have thousands of members, the Clock-building is under way, and tomorrow we open our new public space. 

"Now" is never just a moment. The Long Now is the recognition that the precise moment you’re in grows out of the past and is a seed for the future. The longer your sense of Now, the more past and future it includes. It’s ironic that, at a time when humankind is at a peak of its technical powers, able to create huge global changes that will echo down the centuries, most of our social systems seem geared to increasingly short nows. Huge industries feel pressure to plan for the bottom line and the next shareholders meeting. Politicians feel forced to perform for the next election or opinion poll. The media attract bigger audiences by spurring instant and heated reactions to human interest stories while overlooking longer-term issues - the real human interest.

Photo by Kelly Ida Scope from the Eno-Hillis Seminar in January 02014.  More here.

For our 100th post on Tumblr, here’s one of the great texts about Long Now: the essay by Brian Eno that gave name to the Clock and our organization. “The Big Here and the Long Now" was written in 01995 before the Foundation was formally founded. Long Now existed only as an idea in conversation between Danny Hillis, Stewart Brand, Eno, Kevin Kelly, and others back then. Now we have thousands of members, the Clock-building is under way, and tomorrow we open our new public space

"Now" is never just a moment. The Long Now is the recognition that the precise moment you’re in grows out of the past and is a seed for the future. The longer your sense of Now, the more past and future it includes. It’s ironic that, at a time when humankind is at a peak of its technical powers, able to create huge global changes that will echo down the centuries, most of our social systems seem geared to increasingly short nows. Huge industries feel pressure to plan for the bottom line and the next shareholders meeting. Politicians feel forced to perform for the next election or opinion poll. The media attract bigger audiences by spurring instant and heated reactions to human interest stories while overlooking longer-term issues - the real human interest.

Photo by Kelly Ida Scope from the Eno-Hillis Seminar in January 02014.  More here.